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This webpage provides help how to develop tables using the different types of data queries on our web-based system, EpiCenter.

Overall Injury Surveillance

Injury Data Summaries

Selected Injury Topics

Population Data

 

Overall Injury Surveillance

To build a table, select from these options:

Outcome

Select either "Death", "Non-fatal Hospitalization", or "Non-fatal Emergency Department Visits".  These all indicate the outcome or health care utilization the injury resulted in.

Rates

User can check the "Show crude rates" checkbox to get rates per 100,000 incidents based on California population data from the California Department of Finance (DOF).  Rates are not displayed in the output if there are fewer than 20 cases available, because rates generated from small numbers may not be reliable.  Population data may not be available to produce rates for all categories listed in the output (selected under "Additional Detail").

Due to differences in how race/ethnicity is classified in the population and injury data, caution should be used when interpreting rates involving race/ethnicity.  When rates and race/ethnicity are selected, the output will omit the DOF's "Multirace" category since this is not a category in the injury data, and will include "Unknown" and "Other" in the "White" category since this corresponds to how race/ethnicity is categorized in the DOF population data.  For more information on how the race/ethnicity categories vary and affect the rate calculations, please see our About our Data page.

Year

Select the start and end years of the range you are interested in. To look at just one year in particular, select that year for both the start and end year (i.e. selecting 2000 through 2000 will look only at 2000 data). Be sure the end year is the same year or a later year than your starting year. The default value is the most current year of data we have available.

County of residence

This field is the county of residence of the injured person. It is not safe to assume that this is the county where the injury occurred.  Selecting one or more counties here will narrow the number of cases you are looking at.  You can also select county of residence as an additional level of detail (see below) if you want to compare the number of injuries in different counties.  The default selection is "California", to give data for the whole state.  You can select multiple counties by holding down the "CTRL" key on your keyboard (or "Mac" key for Mac users). 

Race/Ethnicity

Select from: White, Black, Hispanic, Native American, Asian/Pacific Islander, and Other/Unknown.  You can select multiple races/ethnicities by holding down the "CTRL" key on your keyboard (or "Mac" key for Mac users).  To find out more about how the Race/Ethnicity is generated, see our About our Data page.

Age

If you want to look at all ages, make sure the "All ages" button is selected.  The default value is to look at all ages. If you want to narrow your query to a specific age range, type the starting and ending ages for your age group in the appropriate boxes, and remember to click on the button for "Custom Age Range". To look at a single year of age, such as only 4 year-olds, enter the same value in both boxes (i.e. enter "From 4 through 4".  To include those that are less than 1 year old, enter "0".  If you want to look at everyone over a specific age, say 65, specify "From 65 through 120 years old".

Cause Group

If you are interested in a particular type of injury, select that type here.  The default selection is "All injuries", which means you will be looking at all deaths, emergency department visits, or hospitalizations due to injuries. We also offer the ability to select all injuries of a specific intent ("All unintentional injuries", "All self-inflicted injuries", and "All assault injuries"). Finally, you can narrow your focus to a specific injury type, or even several different causes of injury.  On a PC, you can select multiple causes by holding down the Control button and clicking on the causes you are interested in. {Use the "Mac" key if you are using a Mac.)

See what ICD-9 and -10 codes are in each injury category    

Specific Cause

This option allows you to select specific individual cause of injury codes.  For example, if "falls" is too general, you might select an ICD code for a specific type of fall such as “from a ladder or scaffold”.  This option can be tricky. If you're unsure about the results you are getting, contact us by email SACB@cdph.ca.gov or phone (916-552-9800) and we'll be happy to help or double check your results. 

When using this box, enter the codes you want separated by commas or spaces. For ICD-9 codes, do not include the leading "E", but for ICD-10 codes, do include the "U", "V", "W", "X", or "Y". You cannot enter a range (810-819 or V80-V89); you must enter each specific code. Be sure to include the appropriate number of digits - some codes are only 3 digits (such as 896 or W20) while others may be 4 or 5 digits (such as 9001 or V500).  If you enter fewer digits than required, you will get unpredictable results. To look up ICD codes we recommend you use a hard copy ICD manual.  You may be able to find an online ICD lookup, but check that what you find is current (ICD coding does change a little bit each year), and it will be difficult to find ICD-10 codes online.

Sometimes an easier way to get information about specific causes is to select the general category in which you are interested using the "Cause" category selector above and then under “Additional Detail” below, select "Cause of Injury (ICD9/ICD10 codes)".  This gives you a count of the number of cases with each specific ICD code that comprise that category. This way you don't have to worry about exactly how to enter the codes. 

Output Options

You have two different output types to choose from. Each has strengths and weaknesses that are discussed in more detail below. HTML will be fastest output to create so you may choose to work with that until you get just the results you want, then select a different output format. The default selection is HTML format.

1) HTML (good for viewing online)

Selecting HTML means your table will come back as a web page. This is great for viewing online and okay for printing small tables that will fit on a single sheet of paper.

Bonus tip: HTML tables are also easy to copy and paste into your favorite spreadsheet or word processing program. Just use your mouse to highlight the title and table body (or use "Select All") and then copy the selected text. Go to your spreadsheet or text document and paste. After pasting into the other program, you can remove or clear the formatting so that it looks a little neater. You can also resize the text, change the font and colors and/or adjust the cell sizes as needed to fit with your document.

2) PDF (good for printing)

To view PDF documents, you need to have Adobe Acrobat Reader installed on your computer. This format has better control over where page breaks fall so this is the best format to use for printing.

Additional detail (optional section)

These are optional fields that let you get more detailed information about the injury cases you selected above. For example, if you wanted to know the number of suicides there are among males versus females, you would select "All self-inflicted injuries" as the cause and then select "Sex" as a detail variable in this optional area. You do not need to use these fields unless you want further details about the injuries you are looking at. You can use just one field or all four depending upon how much detail you think you need. The only rule is that you need to use them in order (first, then second, then third, then fourth.).

Using these options, you can create huge tables, so this site doesn't create "R x C" tables where you have one variable across the top and another down the side. Instead, all the variables will be listed down the side next to each other. All the same information is there, and with some creative cutting and pasting (tip: try pasting the data "transposed" in Excel) you can create an "R x C" table if that is what you need. The first variable you select will be the first grouping created and the second variable will be listed as sub-levels of each level of the first variable.  See our About our Data page for more information on specific fields in the Additional Detail section.

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Injury Data Summaries

To build a table, select from these options:

Outcome

Select either "Death", "Non-fatal Hospitalization", or "Non-fatal Emergency Department Visits".  These all indicate the outcome or health care utilization the injury resulted in.

Report

Select the type of report you want to look at.  There are 4 types of basic reports to view: Injury by Cause and Age, Top Five Causes of Injury, Injury Trends with Frequencies (which gives you the counts of injuries throughout the years), and Injury Trends with Rates (which calculates the rate of injury using California population data).   Tip: If you want to look at more detailed reports that you can generate your own detail for, please run the "Overall Injury Surveillance" data query.

Year

Select the start and end years of the range you are interested in. To look at just one year in particular, select that year for both the start and end year (i.e. selecting 2000 through 2000 will look only at 2000 data). Be sure the end year is the same year or a later year than your starting year. The default value is the most current year of data we have available.

County of residence

This field is the county of residence of the injured person. It is not safe to assume that this is the county where the injury occurred.  Selecting one or more counties here will narrow the number of cases you are looking at.  The default selection is "California", to give data for the whole state.  You can select multiple counties by holding down the "CTRL" key on your keyboard (or "Mac" key for Mac users). 

Output Options

You have two different output types to choose from. Each has strengths and weaknesses that are discussed in more detail below. HTML will be fastest output to create so you may choose to work with that until you get just the results you want, then select a different output format. The default selection is HTML format.

1) HTML (good for viewing online)

Selecting HTML means your table will come back as a web page. This is great for viewing online and okay for printing small tables that will fit on a single sheet of paper.

Bonus tip: HTML tables are also easy to copy and paste into your favorite spreadsheet or word processing program. Just use your mouse to highlight the title and table body (or use "Select All") and then copy the selected text. Go to your spreadsheet or text document and paste. After pasting into the other program, you can remove or clear the formatting so that it looks a little neater. You can also resize the text, change the font and colors and/or adjust the cell sizes as needed to fit with your document.

2) PDF (good for printing)

To view PDF documents, you need to have Adobe Acrobat Reader installed on your computer. This format has better control over where page breaks fall so this is the best format to use for printing.

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Selected Injury Topics 

To build a table, select from these options:

Topic

Select a cause of injury from the list of selected injury topics.  Not all causes of injury are included here; the ones here may be included because of a specific need or demand, or because of a special project the Safe and Active Communities Branch has been involved in surrounding that topic.  If you do not see the injury topic you are looking for, please look at the "Overall Injury Surveillance" query to find what you are looking for.

Outcome

Select either "Death", "Non-fatal Hospitalization", or "Non-fatal Emergency Department Visits".  These all indicate the outcome or health care utilization the injury resulted in.

County of residence

This field is the county of residence of the injured person. It is not safe to assume that this is the county where the injury occurred.  Selecting one or more counties here will narrow the number of cases you are looking at.  The default selection is "California", to give data for the whole state.  You can select multiple counties by holding down the "CTRL" key on your keyboard (or "Mac" key for Mac users). 

Table

Select the type of table you want to look at.  The types vary depending on what injury topic you select:

  • By Age and Sex
  • By Age and Race/Ethnicity
  • By Age and Year
  • By Age and Month-You can only select this for Death data.  This differs from the hospitalization and emergency department data because the "day of the week" that the injury occurred is not available in the death data.
  • By Age and Month and Day of the Week- You can only select this for hospitalization and emergency department data.
  • By Age and Cause/Mechanism - You can only select this if you select an injury topic that includes more specific information on cause within that topic.  For example, if you select "Homicide", the "Age by Cause/Mechnism" table will tell you how the homicide occurred (abuse and neglect, unarmed fight, firemarm, etc.)

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Population Data

To build a table, select from these options:

County 

This field is the county of residence in the Department of Finance's population data.  The default selection is "California", to give data for the whole state.  You can select multiple counties by holding down the "CTRL" key on your keyboard (or "Mac" key for Mac users).  Check the checkbox provided here if you want to select more than one county, but see the data broken out by each county.  Otherwise, the data for all the counties you select will be aggregated.

Year

Select the start and end years of the range you are interested in. To look at just one year in particular, select that year for both the start and end year (i.e. selecting 2000 through 2000 will look only at 2000 data). Be sure the end year is the same year or a later year than your starting year. The default value is the most current year of data we have available.The output will give you each year reported separately in a table.

Age

If you want to look at all ages, make sure the "All ages" button is selected.  The default value is to look at all ages. If you want to narrow your query to a specific age range, type the starting and ending ages for your age group in the appropriate boxes, and remember to click on the button for "Custom Age Range". To look at a single year of age, such as only 4 year-olds, enter the same value in both boxes (i.e. enter "From 4 through 4".  To include those that are less than 1 year old, enter "0".  If you want to look at everyone over a specific age, say 65, specify "From 65 through 120 years old".

Sex

Select "Male" or "Female" for more specific gender information.  Default is "All" which will give you all genders that are in the population data.

Race/Ethnicity

Select from: White/Unknown/Other, Black, Hispanic, Native American, Asian/Pacific Islander, and Multirace.  Note that the categories of race/ethnicity for Population data are different from the categories for race/ethnicity in our injury data.  Also, the California Department of Finance (DOF) did not start collecting and reporting data on "Multirace" until 2000.  Therefore, the population numbers for specific races/ethnicities will differ quite drastically for years prior to 2000, compared to 2000 and later, since the population that was "multi-race" would have been categorized as one of the other races/ethnicites prior to 2000. For this reason, caution must be used when comparing population numbers or rates for years prior to 2000 and after 2000 when using race/ethnicity.  For more information on race/ethnicity classifications in population data, see About our Data.

Output Options

You have two different output types to choose from. Each has strengths and weaknesses that are discussed in more detail below. HTML will be fastest output to create so you may choose to work with that until you get just the results you want, then select a different output format. The default selection is HTML format.

1) HTML (good for viewing online)

Selecting HTML means your table will come back as a web page. This is great for viewing online and okay for printing small tables that will fit on a single sheet of paper.

Bonus tip: HTML tables are also easy to copy and paste into your favorite spreadsheet or word processing program. Just use your mouse to highlight the title and table body (or use "Select All") and then copy the selected text. Go to your spreadsheet or text document and paste. After pasting into the other program, you can remove or clear the formatting so that it looks a little neater. You can also resize the text, change the font and colors and/or adjust the cell sizes as needed to fit with your document.

2) PDF (good for printing)

To view PDF documents, you need to have Adobe Acrobat Reader installed on your computer. This format has better control over where page breaks fall so this is the best format to use for printing.  

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Still need help?

Send us an e-mail at SACB@cdph.ca.gov!

 

 
 
Last modified on: 10/9/2012 1:33 PM