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Medical Management of Lead-Exposed Adults - Frequently Asked Questions

  1. What are the health effects of lead?
  2. What is an “average” blood lead level?
  3. How is our understanding about the health effects of lead changing?
  4. How can I get a copy of  the new recommendations?
  5. What help is available for health care providers who want to follow the new recommendations in their practice?
  6. Are there similar guidelines for medical management of lead-poisoned children?

1What are the health effects of lead?

Click here to see the OLPPP factsheet Lead and Your Health (PDF)Opens in new browser window.

2What is an “average” blood lead level?

The average blood lead level for adults in the United States is currently less than 1 microgram per deciliter (µg/dL). This is significantly lower than in the 1970’s, when the average blood lead level for adults was 13 µg/dL. The decrease is due in large part to the removal of lead from gasoline, residential paint, and canned food.

3How is our understanding about the health effects of lead changing?

Current research shows that lead is harmful to the body at lower levels, levels that were previously thought safe. This is especially true if a person is exposed over a long period of time. Lead exposure has been shown to contribute to health problems such as high blood pressure, nervous system and kidney damage, and problems with pregnancy. Even if a person is not currently being exposed to lead, this health damage can continue as lead that is stored in bones gradually moves back into the bloodstream.

4How can I get a copy of the new recommendations?

Recommendations for Medical Management of Adult Lead Exposure (PDF)Opens in new browser window were published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives in March 2007and are now widely available. OLPPP provides this information and the journal article to occupational medicine specialists, primary care providers, poison control centers, health departments, laboratories, health and safety professionals, employers, and others on a regular basis.

5What help is available for health care providers who want to follow the new recommendations in their practice?

The Occupational Lead Poisoning Prevention Program (OLPPP) has developed two new resources specifically for health care providers:  In April 2009 we published updated guidelines for health care providers, Medical Guidelines for the Lead-Exposed Worker (PDF)Opens in new browser window. The guidelines review recent scientific information and make health-based recommendations on how to provide state-of-the-art care for lead-exposed adults. They also cover specific medical requirements of the Cal/OSHA lead standards.  OLPPP has also recently developed a FREE ONLINE CME COURSE for health care providers, Overview of Adult/Occupational Lead Poisoning in California.

6Are there similar guidelines for medical management of lead-poisoned children?

Yes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have developed guidelines for health professionals that care for lead-exposed children. To see this publication, go to Managing Elevated Blood Lead Levels Among Young Children - Recommendations from the Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention,” March 2002.  You can also call 1-888-232-6789 (toll-free) to obtain a printed copy of the Case Management document. 

 

Medical Management of Lead-Exposed Adults main page

Occupational Lead Poisoning Prevention Program (OLPPP) home page

Occupational Health Branch (OHB) home page

 
 
Last modified on: 10/2/2014 11:13 AM